The death history of Travis Manion And Brendan Looney – Obituary 2021

The story of Travis Manion And Brendan Looney on @NFLonFOX by Tom Rinaldi is both heartbreaking and inspiring. Made me feel like I know those two heroes and it hurts.

Navy veteran Chuck Segel (Chuck Segel) has a unique connection with the Travis Manion Foundation, especially the chairman Ryan Manion. After Travis was struck by 1stLt Travis Manion (USMC) and pulled to safety a few minutes before Travis was seriously injured, Chuck has been trying to recover from that day’s events for the past 13 years.

In February 2020, after Chuck and Ryan continued to cross, he and her, other heroes and veterans’ families went to Puerto Rico to rebuild and repair houses damaged by Hurricane Maria. On Memorial Day, Chuck and Ryan told The Today Show about their connection and the impact of the TMF program on the well-being and mental health of participants. Watch the video above.

After graduating from the academy in 2004, Manion chose to become a Marine Corps officer. The active-duty soldier demonstrated his wisdom and leadership skills and was assigned and assigned to the First Reconnaissance Battalion of the First Marine Corps First Expeditionary Force Camp in Pendleton, California. Soon thereafter, he was sent to Iraq for the first mission in 2005.

Manion and his troops were involved in many important events, including supporting elections, discovering weapons hideouts throughout the region, and many other transitional missions in Iraq. In September 2006, he was selected as an experienced Iraqi veteran and withdrew from the first reconnaissance team to become a member of the military transition team, which will train with 10 other marines. These The Marine Corps will be attached to the Iraqi Army Battalion in Fallujah.

True to his commitment to public service, Manion prepared for his second tour on December 26, 2006 in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. He served as a company adviser for the 3rd Battalion, 2nd Brigade, 6th Regiment Combat Team, and the Second Marine Expeditionary Force (Advance) of the Iraqi Army’s 1st Division Military Transition Group. Manian and his Marine Corps comrades worked hard to change the results of Fallujah, established a brotherhood with the Iraqi army, and set an example with strong leadership.

Manian and his Marine Corps comrades bravely changed the situation on this critical battlefield. Thanks to their efforts, Anbar Province is now considered one of the most important successes in Iraq’s troop surge. On April 29, 2007, in his last patrol mission, Manion made his final sacrifice.

His patrol is ending a search of the suspected insurgent’s house, which was shot with precision light weapons. As the soldier was severely injured by the enemy’s fire, the attack developed into a full-scale ambush, and Manion and a Marine exposed themselves to more and more firepower to pull the soldier out of the kill zone.

After rescuing the body and giving first aid, Manion led his patrol to fight back and personally wiped out an enemy’s position. When he continued to command the patrol, another Marine was injured. Under the fire of five insurgents, he once again passed through the killing zone to rescue the injured Marines.

The reinforcements of the Iraqi army were stopped by improvised explosive devices and were unable to advance on the flanks of the insurgents. Mann and his patrol could only fire in three ways. While fearlessly exposing himself to gain a more favorable shooting position and pulling the enemy’s firepower away from the injured Marines, Manion was hit to death by an enemy sniper. According to his medal quotes, his brave and thoughtful behavior inspired the final counterattack and ultimately saved the lives of every member of his patrol.

After rescuing the body and giving first aid, Manion led his patrol to fight back and personally wiped out an enemy’s position. When he continued to command the patrol, another Marine was injured. Under the fire of five insurgents, he once again passed through the killing zone to rescue the injured Marines. The reinforcements of the Iraqi army were stopped by improvised explosive devices and were unable to advance on the flanks of the insurgents.

Mann and his patrol could only fire in three ways. While fearlessly exposing himself to gain a more favorable shooting position and pulling the enemy’s firepower away from the injured Marines, Manion was hit to death by an enemy sniper. According to his medal quotes, his brave and thoughtful behavior inspired the final counterattack and ultimately saved the lives of every member of his patrol.

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